Solutions

Food & agriculture - July 13

Staff, Energy Bulletin

Newsom's fresh idea: mandates on healthier food
A Geodesic Greenhouse — Year-Round Gardening at 6000 Feet
Announcing the Release of ‘Can Totnes and District Feed Itself?’

archived July 13, 2009
	

Deep thought - July 13

Staff, Energy Bulletin

A problem of security
Energy Bill Ignores Resource Depletion
Interview with Carolyn Baker about her book Sacred Demise
Peak oil means peak food as well

archived July 13, 2009
	

Grains and how we get them - July 12

Staff, Energy Bulletin

This post talks about a seldom-mentioned aspect of local sustainable food production: how do we get our carbs? Local and urban fruit and veg production is all very well and needs to be encouraged, but as East Anglia Food Link Coordinator Tully Wakeman says, "...fruit and veg supplies only about 10% of our calories". How and where our grains are grown, and how they can be sustainably transported and processed form the crux of this issue.

archived July 6, 2009
	

Solutions & sustainability - July 10

Staff, Energy Bulletin

David de Rothschild: Saving the world, one adventure at a time
Before We 'Save' Journalism
Auto-ban: German town goes car-free

archived July 10, 2009
	

Food & agriculture - July 9

Staff, Energy Bulletin

Eat What You Grow, Grow What You Eat?
Coming Soon: ‘Local Food’, a Transition guide, and an interview with the author
Pelosi buys off agri-business to advance climate bill

archived July 9, 2009
	

Transition Towns - July 9

Staff, Energy Bulletin

Book Review: The Transition Timeline
Insights on Resilience from the Recent History of Totnes. 1: Back garden food production
Tooting Catches Carnival Cash

archived July 9, 2009
	

The wealth of nature

John Michael Greer, The Archdruid Report

The Archdruid continues his survey of ecological economics with a look at the economic role of natural processes. If, as studies suggest, three-fourths of all economic value in the world today is produced by nature rather than human labor, is it time to start treating nature as the primary economy, and human economic activity as a secondary economy dependent on it?

archived July 9, 2009
	

MuseLetter 206 - June 2009 (French translation)

Richard Heinberg, Energy Bulletin

Ce mois-ci, la Museletter réunit deux articles qui partagent un thème commun : l’Humanité est-elle capable de réaliser les changements nécessaires au sauvetage de la planète et par la même occasion à son propre sauvetage ?

archived July 8, 2009
	

Bikes and traffic - July 8

Staff, Energy Bulletin

How driving a car into Manhattan costs $160
Bicycle Production Reaches 130 Million Units
Bike Among the Ruins

archived July 8, 2009
	

Imagining the impossible

Chaia Heller , Reimagining Society Project

While living modestly, these peoples' lives were filled with sumptuous dreams they worked to transform into reality. While they certainly suffered from bouts of frustration and dismay over the years, none of these greats surrendered to what we call today ‘political burn-out'—or worse, just plain jadedness. ... If environmental activists evaluate their work in terms of immediate efficacy and pragmatic ‘do-ableness', they often collapse after five to ten years (sometimes far less) under the weight of abject disappointment. They resent themselves, their movements, and the world, for not changing fast enough.

archived July 7, 2009