Global

Deep thought - June 16

Staff, Energy Bulletin

The Barbaric Heart: Capitalism and the crisis of nature
Collapse conundrum: confrontation or descent by degrees
Only faith can solve the energy crisis
Bigger Isn't Better
Can We Survive the 'Anthropocene' Period?

archived June 16, 2009
	

Peak Oil Review - June 15

Tom Whipple, ASPO-USA

A weekly roundup of Peak oil news, including:
-Production and prices
-China
-US imports
-Briefs

archived June 15, 2009
	

Home: a film by Yann Arthus-Bertrand

Marcin Gerwin, Energy Bulletin

Magnificent! From belugas in the Arctic to skyscrapers in Dubai. From glaciers in Himalayas to devastated Easter Island. The images of the Earth captured from above are breathtaking.

archived June 13, 2009
	

Sacred Demise (review)

Kristin Sponsler, Energy Bulletin

If you are familiar with author and ecopsychologist Carolyn Baker’s previous work, you know she makes no apologies for the doomer stance she developed since becoming aware of "the invasion and occupation of Iraq, Peak Oil, a fraudulent 2004 election, global warming, and at this writing, what appears to be full-blown economic meltdown."

archived June 12, 2009
	

Deep thought - June 12

Staff, Energy Bulletin

Jason Bradford: A Message to the Nearly Converted
Profiting from Scarcity
A Review of Neil Jackson’s Photo Essay "Conflict"

archived June 12, 2009
	

Peak oil, prices, and supplies - June 12

Staff, Energy Bulletin

Klare: It's Official -- The Era of Cheap Oil Is Over
BP: The centre of gravity in the global energy market has changed and we need to wake up
Oil Heading to $40; Natural Gas Better Bet: Analyst

archived June 12, 2009
	

ODAC Newsletter - June 12

Staff, Oil Depletion Analysis Centre

A weekly update from a UK perspective, including Guest Commentary.

archived June 12, 2009
	

Humanity’s Choice: A Series of Exits—Not a Fork in the Road

Chris Clugston, Energy Bulletin

The ecological and economic prognosticators who warn of a potentially unpleasant future for the human enterprise typically portray humanity as being at a fork in the road on our evolutionary journey. They contend that we are at a pivotal decision point at which we must make an “either/or” choice between a positive future outcome and a negative future outcome.

archived June 11, 2009
	

Julian's tragedy

Damien Perrotin, The View from Brittany

It is, of course only a novel, but it offers a good rationale for us to enter politics. Nobody can predict what shape the future will take, and even if we can be pretty sure the present world is going to collapse, its demise will take time and it can be succeeded by a lot of things, not all of them pleasant...Yet we can work to cushion the decline and make sure that whoever will succeed us will inherit the best of what we have...This is not a very rewarding job and it is as likely to fail as to succeed. Sometimes it will leave you with a bitter aftertaste and even victories will sometimes feel empty, but it certainly beats replaying Julian's tragedy.

archived June 10, 2009
	

Media & persuasion - June 10

Staff, Energy Bulletin

Climate change theatre
Calling Earth from the Air: world release of green movie ‘Home’
It's the end of the world as we know it (annotated)
Your Chance to See ‘In Transition’, the emerging plans for its release, as well as an appeal for help in finishing it…

archived June 10, 2009