Food & agriculture

The myth of efficiency

Peak Oil Hausfrau, Blogspot

What makes efficiency? Is it clever management? The "productivity" of human resources? Economies of scale? Centralization? Better information and computer systems? The competition of markets? Business people give credit to these innovations, and all of these changes may contribute incrementally to the cheapness of our food, but these are just icing on the cake. The real underpinning of what we think of as efficiency is cheap energy - especially cheap oil.

archived May 20, 2009
	

Food & agriculture - May 20

Staff, Energy Bulletin

For urban gardeners, lead is a concern
The sewage plant carries the sweet smell of valuable phosphorus
Back to the “old normal” of domesticity
Going up? Farming in high-rises raises hopes
Transitioning our food from fossil fuel based to sun based

archived May 20, 2009
	

Waste and recycling - May 19

Staff, Energy Bulletin

The sewage plant carries the sweet smell of valuable phosphorus
Recession leads to big drop in amount of rubbish we are throwing away
Severn Trent sees light at the end of the tunnel for its new revenue plan

archived May 19, 2009
	

Food & agriculture - May 18

Staff, Energy Bulletin

Michael Pollan: Deep agriculture (talk)
Let them eat cash: Can Bill Gates turn hunger into profit?
Ten things you can do to fight world hunger
The 21st century's bleak harvest

archived May 18, 2009
	

Food & agriculture - May 15

Staff, Energy Bulletin

Against the grain of industrial agriculture, truly local bread stages a comeback
Legal or Not, Chickens Are the Chic New Backyard Addition
China goes farming as factories close

archived May 15, 2009
	

Food & agriculture - May 14

Staff, Energy Bulletin

The ‘Process’ of Rebuilding a Local Food Economy
Michael Pollan Dishes out Advice on Healthful Eating
How should we eat to ensure a sustainable future?
There is No Box: Big Ideas About Urban Agriculture and Local Food Systems

archived May 14, 2009
	

Bushels of nettles

Brian Kaller, Restoring Mayberry

You are surrounded by food. You probably have nettles in your area, but even if you don’t, maybe you have daisies, dandelions, clover, sorrel, brambles, berries, goosefoot, cowslips and dozens of other plants. Maybe you have local hazels, cobnuts and walnuts – even acorns can be made edible. There are local animals to eat, local sources of water, ways to warm up or keep cool. How do I know this? Because people lived for the first 99 percent of humanity’s history, almost everywhere on Earth – in deserts, on ice caps, and certainly in the forests and fields that are now America and Europe -- when all food, all water, all shelter, was wild.

archived May 12, 2009
	

Food & agriculture - May 12

Staff, Energy Bulletin

Peak phosphorus: the sequel to peak oil ?
Finding my Herb Garden
Wisconsin Fourth-Graders Boycott School Lunch
Hungry For Land
A Doomer's Spring

archived May 12, 2009
	

Hacia a una Economía del Bosque

Robert Hart, Earth Conservation

Translation into Spanish of the first chapter from the Robert Hart's classic Forest Gardening. This chapter presents a vision of how the whole economy can be based on forest gardens

archived May 11, 2009
	

Deep thought - May 11

Staff, Energy Bulletin

The Future of the American Dream
Peak-Oil Prophet James Howard Kunstler on Food, Fuel and Why He Became an Almost Vegan
What's at Stake

archived May 11, 2009